Bridgegate: A Talmud Study

GW bridgeBridgegate.

The story broke two weeks ago, and updates are still front-page news.

Allegedly, New Jersey Governor Christie’s leadership team closed lanes on the George Washington Bridge into Fort Lee for no reason — except to annoy the mayor of Fort Lee, who did not endorse Christie’s bid for re-election.

No one died in the four-day traffic jam. However, some very nasty emails were circulated. Emails documenting a petty, mean-spirited understanding of political exchange, in which politics serves individual careers rather than the common good.

“Moving on can’t happen,” says one New York Times reader-commentator, “until Christie accepts the blame for creating and enabling the culture that led to Bridge-gate.”

Two weeks ago, at our Or Shalom-Temple Sholom Young Adult Talmud study, we agreed: it is a matter of creating an ethical culture. Around a table at Kafka’s Coffee and Tea in Vancouver, Canada, graduate students in political science, education, business and medicine discussed a famous passage of Talmud (Bava Metzia 58b) about verbal fraud.

Just as there is fraud in buying and selling, so too there is fraud in words. One may not say to a merchant, “How much is this object,” if one does not wish to buy. 

“Why not?” I asked. “Why should I not entertain myself by bantering with a shopkeeper?”

Because, students said, business is based on trust. Asking prices for no reason gives a false impression; thus, it is a breach of trust. Normally, we assume we can trust our business associates, unless we have a specific reason not to. If you think you are too cynical and savvy to trust naively, remember your behavior when shopping in the supermarket. You read labels, assume the information is true, purchase a product, and put it right into your body.

And because, students said, it is personally harmful to the shopkeeper. By engaging with you, the shopkeeper invests time. The time, however, might have been more wisely invested in another customer. The shopkeeper also invests emotional energy in you. When you falsely represent yourself, you manipulate the shopkeeper’s mood, for your own purposes.

And because, students said, words are the foundation of human communication. When you intentionally misuse words, you undermine a social foundation. The real purpose of communication is to create human community. In fact, the real purpose of business is to create community. When you are dishonest in business, you undermine human community.

At this point in the discussion – I am not making this up – an education student said, “Hey, did you hear about what happened in New Jersey?” Words were used badly, moods were manipulated, trust was broken, and community was undermined.

For the matter is entrusted to the heart, and concerning any matter that is entrusted to the heart, it was said: “And you shall fear your God” (Leviticus 25:17).  

“When you do a very small wrong,” said a medical student, “you may think you are getting away with it, but God sees what happened.”

“Let’s get away from the idea of God as a judge,” said another medical student, “and talk about our conscience. When you do something bad, you feel bad.”

“And the bad feeling in you affects others,” said a business student. “If we want good relationships, we have to stop stockpiling lists of times others harmed us.” Otherwise, we retaliate simply for the sake of retaliation – as Governor Christie’s team seems to have done.

Didn’t the students think they were getting a little overly spiritual? After all, we were discussing business and politics.

“There are higher truths than business,” said a political science student.

“The matter is entrusted to the heart, and that’s where God lives,” said a medical student. “God is the space where we do interpersonal mitzvot. Create a trusting community, and you bring God into the world.”

As they talked, I began to see the bridge as a metaphor. Bridge-gate does open onto higher principles. A bridge of trust connects humans in community; narrow the bridge, and community is constricted. Jewish mystics talk about the flow of divine energy that animates the world. When we see only our selves and fail to honour others who help sustain us, we block the flow.

The students in our Talmud group understand this higher truth. May they be the politicians, educators, healers, and business leaders of the future.

Image: theoldmotor.com. Cross-posted at Rabbis Without Borders at My Jewish Learning.

Categories: God, Political, Spiritual Growth

Tags: , , ,

2 replies

  1. >>>
    “There are higher truths than business,” said a political science student.
    <<<

    Doesn't the Talmud say:

    . . . When a soul dies and is judged, the first question will be:

    . . . . . Were you honest in business?

    There are not "higher" and "lower" truths; God is wherever we let Her in.

    • Charles, thanks! On the one hand, not so different from their observation that business is one aspect of building and enacting community.

      On the other hand, had you been there, perhaps discussion about this particular comment would have turned in this direction. Instead, we talked about idealism and realism in politics.

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